Teaching English Online: How to Get Started

How to teach English onlineTeaching English online is a great opportunity for teachers who want all the benefits of teaching abroad with the comforts of teaching from home. In addition to providing the opportunity for location independence, teaching online guarantees you a schedule of flexibility that in-classroom teaching does not. You are entitled (in almost every situation) to create your own schedule and teach as many classes as you’d like- though many companies will require an average minimum of five classes per week. Financially, experiences will vary between companies and individual teachers. However, you are certainly able to build a career that meets your wants and needs, whether that be to teach a full-time schedule or a few classes each week to earn some extra cash.

While accepting a TEFL placement abroad is usually a fairly lengthy process complete with interviews, visa procedures, flight bookings, accommodation considerations, and, of course, packing up and moving your entire life to another country, teaching English online is a far more simple process. But exactly how does someone start their online career? First, it’s important to decide which type of position best matches your goals and experience. From there, you’ll need to get connected with the appropriate people.

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Using ESL Games to Teach Grammar to Children

Teaching grammar ESL gamesTeaching grammar may be the most daunting part of your TESOL job, especially if you have to teach grammar to young learners. The problem that most teachers face is that they don’t know how to teach grammar using the Communicative Approach, so they follow the textbook or present the grammar point on the board. Those who take their TESOL certification course with OnTESOL know that the grammar lesson does not have to be boring! The purpose of a communicative grammar class is to use activities that go beyond the generation of correct language. Teaching grammar in context is a key principle of the Communicative Approach. Playing is the natural state of children, as games are the way kids relate to their friends and family in a meaningful way. Hence, ESL games permit meaningful utilization of the language in context and children are more inspired to learn grammar with games.

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6 Tips for Teaching English Online

Teaching English onlineTeaching English is undeniably a challenging task; taking out the tactility of the classroom and replacing it with a computer screen presents even more of a challenge. The age of the students and the level of prior English skills that they have in store will certainly make huge differences to the online environment. As such, there really isn’t an all-encompassing formula to use when teaching English online. There are so many different areas of English language to study and innumerable teaching methods, so it’s crucial to suss out what will work best for your particular students through trial and error. However, there are a few general tips that are applicable across the spectrum of online teaching, and adding them to your teaching repertoire will only increase your successes as an online ESL instructor.

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8 Tips for Teaching English to Beginners

Teaching English to BeginnersTeaching English to Beginners may seem like a challenge at the start, but these tips can help. You may find (like me) that this is your favourite level to work with!

1) Keep it Simple

Pay careful attention to your language in class. Use simple sentence structure, and avoid long explanations.  Try to use materials that are visually uncluttered, too. This will help learners focus on the key information.

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6 Elements of an Awesome ESL Lesson Plan

How to plan an ESL lesson - ESL lesson planningHaving a clear objective is the most important element to consider when developing an ESL lesson plan. Having a clear objective is the first building block to the planning and development process. It’s the thing (or things) that you want your students to learn and take-away from the lesson. Having a clear objective will guide the rest of your planning process. The objective can be expressed in a variety of ways, but, for organizational purposes, it’s easiest to use the same template for most lessons. For example, you could start your lesson plan with the following phrase: “Students will be able to…” and finish with the objective(s) for the day. A good rule of thumb to have is that if an activity doesn’t bring your students to (or closer to) your end goal, modify it or nix it altogether.

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6 Ways to May Be Teaching English All Wrong

How not to teach EnglishFirst, don’t assume that you are an expert on the language just because you speak it. Even if English is your native language, that doesn’t mean that you know all of the grammatical intricacies that come with it. For most of us, learning our mother tongue was an entirely organic process. Learning in such a way is great when you are constantly surrounded by it and can put things into context without even thinking twice. However, this is not the case for those who are learning English as a second language. Don’t give answers to students if you do not know the answer. Making up something that sounds good to you can confuse them beyond the point of no return, and it just makes you look silly. To avoid this situation, be sure to brush up on the grammar points that you are scheduled to teach before creating your lesson plans and before each lesson itself. Better yet, take a TESOL course and get the ultimate refresher on how to properly use and teach grammar and syntax. Below you will find 5 ways you may be teaching English all wrong.

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Teaching IELTS Writing: Strategies for Developing Task 2 Planning Skills

How to teach IELTS by OnTESOLWhether they’re sitting for the academic or the general format of the IELTS test, your candidates will have to write a 250-word essay on an everyday topic (i.e. task 2). One key to performing well in task 2 is devoting five to ten minutes brainstorming ideas and mapping out how they will be discussed before starting the essay. Even for upper-band candidates, jumping into their essay without planning beforehand risks them getting lost along the way, resulting in writing in which the main ideas and supporting details may be confused and difficult to follow. During the actual test, with time ticking away, it can be frustrating and stressful when the candidate realizes what has happened but doesn’t know how to right the ship in the time remaining. For this reason, IELTS instructors should train their candidates how to plan before starting their essay. Here are some strategies to consider.

About the Author: Greg Askew completed the Advanced TESOL Diploma with OnTESOL. He is currently teaching IELTS in the United Arab Emirates.

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Teaching IELTS Writing: Strategies for Teaching Writing Task 1

Teaching IELTS writingLike the other tests of the IELTS exam, academic task 1 of the IELTS writing test requires knowledge and skills that are generally developed in secondary school, which is why the exam is not recommended for candidates below the age of 16. Firstly, candidates need to have basic visual literacy skills in order to correctly identify and understand the key features of a range of charts, graphs, tables, diagrams, maps, etc. Additionally, they need a reasonable capacity to analyze and evaluate the relationships between these key features and then synthesize this thinking into a summary supported by the details provided. Lastly, they need the language skills with which to articulate their understanding. Depending on where and whom you’re teaching, you may find it necessary to develop your candidates’ visual literacy and critical thinking skills in addition to their language proficiency. This is what I discovered when I began teaching the IELTS exam with secondary students in the UAE. Here are some strategies I’ve used to help my candidates.

About the author: Greg Askew completed the 250-hour TESOL Diploma with OnTESOL and he taught IELTS in the UAE.

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Learn How to Teach English and Pursue a Successful Career with an Accredited TESOL Certification

Learn how to teach English with a TESOL certification courseA TESOL certification by OnTESOL will prepare you for a lucrative teaching career all over the world. We have been around for over 12 years! Our Advanced TESOL Diploma made OnTESOL a world-renowned institute. We are known all over the world for offering the most comprehensive training and preparing teachers for a successful career. Having OnTESOL on your certificate shows employers that you know how to teach English using the most effective methods. Our courses will provide you with professional training to help you become a reflective and independent teacher. When you have the skills to create a full curriculum based on customized lesson plans that meet your students’ needs, you can pursue career advancement opportunities as a school director, a university professor, or even open your own school. Contact us to find out how OnTESOL will help you to become a successful teacher. Below you will find sample videos and free TESOL articles on how to teach English!

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How to Teach IELTS Reading Using Authentic Texts

How to teach IELTS reading testJust as there are many reasons to use authentic texts when teaching IELTS, there are an equal number of considerations when choosing which texts to use. The most important consideration is whether the text is suitable for your candidates’ proficiency level. Reading requires a lot of energy, especially when dealing with unfamiliar vocabulary and structures. The greater the gap between your candidates’ level and the level required means the greater the chance they will lose motivation and focus, which is why sourcing authentic texts can be so challenging—maybe you find the perfect article but the text’s language is too sophisticated. The time it takes to source a text that ticks all the boxes might ultimately put you off using authentic texts altogether. Before giving up, consider modifying a text to achieve your target level, which may ultimately take less time than finding that perfect text. In this TESOL article I will share the process I have used for vetting and developing the texts for candidates targeting an IELTS band 5.0:

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